Product Profile

A Quick Trip to 7.6 Billion

$4.00

$4.00

This colorful, informative poster is an update from an earlier wall chart – A Quick Trip to 7 Billion – which marked the addition of Earth’s 7 billionth member in 2011. But there have been significant changes since that milestone seven years ago, and the new chart has not only updated statistics but focuses on the pressing issues of today. Zoom in on the e-poster to see more details.

On one side of the wall chart you’ll find a timeline of historical events, inventions and social movements that tell the story of our rapid population growth over the past 200 years. Using photographs, demographic data points, and visual displays we see the causation behind changing birth and death rates that brought us to a global family of 7.6 billion in 2018.

The other side of the wall chart uses a variety of colorful infographics to show the challenges we face as human numbers continue to increase – from meeting basic human needs to the delicate balance of natural ecosystems. Easy-to-read data visualizations on urbanization, rainforest cover, child health, and more are sure to grab the interest of all ages.

Note: Get multiple posters at a reduced price. One poster is $4 but if you buy 2 or more, they are just $3/each. An easy, and inexpensive, way to display both sides!

SKU: QT7B Categories: ,

Lesson Plans

Three lessons plans accompany the poster

Exploring the Timeline – Students analyze the timeline on the A Quick Trip to 7.6 Billion poster to answer questions and complete a graphic organizer, exploring how past events have contributed to our current population size and resource use.

Infographic Scavenger Hunt – Through collaborative analysis of visual data (infographics) found on the A Quick Trip to 7.6 Billion poster, students investigate today’s demographics and resource use and how we can reduce future environmental impacts.

Report Card for the Planet – Using the A Quick Trip to 7.6 Billion poster, students complete a “report card” to determine whether progress has been made in key indicators of human well-being and environmental health over the past 200 years, and then evaluate what these changes mean.